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COLLECTION 

OF VICTORIAN BOOKS 

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BRIGHAM YOUNG 

UNIVERSITY 

Victorian 

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&U<2<3Slg,SORS TT© KEWBgRy A.KfD HARRIS *S) 
A SORNER OF 1 3-AjWTT PAUL'S 6HUR6H-TARD, LONDON 



UPB 



Tfffi TOWfiR QT LONDON. 




A POTS & KETTLES TO MERaBELLOWiS TO MEND. 



POTS AND KETTLES TO MEND !— COPPER OR BRASS 

TO MEND ! 

The Tinker is swinging his fire-pot to make it burn, having placed 
his soldering-iron in it, and is proceeding to some corner or post, there 
to repair the saucepan he carries. — We commence with the most in- 
teresting edifice in our capital, 

THE TOWER OF LONDON; 

the fortress, the palace, and prison, in which so many events, connected 
with the history of our country, have transpired. The building with 
four towers in the centre is said to have been erected by William 
the Conqueror, and is the oldest part of the fortress. The small bell- 
tower in the front of our picture is that of the church of St. Peter's, 
(the tower being a parish itself,) on the Tower Green, erected in the reign 
of Edward I. Our view is taken from Tower Hill, near which was the 
scaffold on which so many have fallen. To the left of the picture stood 
the grand storehouse of William III., destroyed by fire, Nov. 1841. 

The Regalia is deposited here, and exhibited to the public, as is also 
the Horse Armoury. The present constable of the Tower is the Duke of 
Wellington. 



B 



RHUBARB !— FINE TURKEY RHUBARB ! 

This drug is carried about for sale by Turks, often habited in the cos- 
tume of their country. They are Turkish Jews, as Mahomedans seldom 
travel. The mode of fixing his caftan also indicates him to be one ; it 
is fastened on the left : the Turks make a distinction by adjusting theirs 
on the right. 

THE EAST INDIA HOUSE 

is situated in Leadenhall Street : it was built in 1726, and afterwards 
enlarged, in 1798, by Mr. Jupp, who erected the present front, the 
pediment of which, by Bacon, exhibits an allegory of the Company, under 
the protection of George III. : on the apex is a statue of Britannia ; 
on the right hand is a figure of Asia, and on the left one of Europe. 
Here is conducted all the official business relating to the Company, 
which now rules a population of 85,000,000 natives of India, besides 
51,000,000 who are directly or indirectly affected by them. It contains 
a Library and Museum, open to the public, free, on Saturdays. 



THE EAST-INDIA HOUSE 




RHUBARB. 



: 



THE BANK &F FiKGIxftKD. 




MATGHSSa*. 



MATCHES !— BUY A BOX OF MATCHES OF A POOR GIRL ! 

Of all the poor itinerants of London the Match-sellers are the poorest, 
and subsist as much by donations as by the sale of their wares. The 
old match, a splinter of wood, with ends dipped in brimstone, is fast 
disappearing before the modern lucifer or congreve. The poor crea- 
ture here represented is appealing to a lady and gentleman, (whose sha- 
dows are seen in the picture,) on their way to the 

BANK OF ENGLAND. 

This great national establishment was erected in 1788 by Sir John 
Soane : it covers about eight acres of ground, and consists of nine open 
courts, almost all the rooms being on the ground-floor, lighted from above, 
beneath which are very extensive cellars, used for the deposit of 
bullion. This building is raised on the course of the ancient stream of 
Wall-Brook. In the Pay-Hall, where the notes are issued and exchanged, 
is a marble statue of William III,, founder of the Bank, by Cheere. 
The Court-Room windows overlook a piece of ground, laid out as a gar- 
den : this was formerly the churchyard of St. Christopher's ; nearly the 
whole of this parish is within the walls of the Bank, the church having 
been removed in 1780, after the riots. The Bank of England is isolated 
from all other buildings, and fire-proof. 



ORANGES! -BUY ORANGES AND LEMONS! 

Here is a poor Irish boy endeavouring to dispose of his oranges 
to some passengers outside an omnibus, in Cornhill, near the 

ROYAL EXCHANGE. 

The merchants used, in olden times, to meet in Lombard Street, until 
Sir Thomas Gresham built the first edifice here, in 1567, from the designs 
of Henrick, a Fleming, who, it is said, made constant journeys from 
London to Flanders, to obtain materials and workmen. All the stone, 
slate, iron, wainscot, and glass, came from Antwerp ; so that the first 
Exchange might be considered a Dutch building. This pile was burnt 
down at the Fire of London, in 1666, and a second Exchange was built 
on the old site, by Gernan, the first stone of which was laid by Charles 
II., and was completed in 1669, at an expense of £59,000, and was 
again destroyed by fire in 1838. The present edifice occupies the same 
spot, of which Prince Albert laid the first stone ; and it was opened, with 
great display, by her Majesty, Queen Victoria, in October, 1844, 
during the mayoralty of Sir W. Magnay. It is from a design by 
William Tite ; the pediment, seen in the drawing, is by R. Westmacott, 
Jun. 



THE R0YAL EXCHANGE. 




Hh ORANGES. SWEET STMICMAFJL ORANGES 



it 



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THE MANSION HOUSE. 




2»CS1 BUY A GftGC FOR YOUR niSTE SINGING BIRD. 



BUY A CAGE FOR YOUR FINE SINGING-BIRD ! 

These little prisons are principally manufactured and sold by fo- 
reigners, who have them of all sizes and shapes (to suit the nature and 
habits of the little captive melodists). 

THE MANSION-HOUSE 

is the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London during his mayor- 
alty ; it is situated at the west end of Cornhill, in Mansion-House Street. 
When it was first resolved, by the Common Council, to build the 
Mansion-House, Lord Burlington sent a design of Palladio, for their 
approbation and adoption. The first question in court was, not as to the 
applicability of the plan, but as to whether Palladio was a freeman 
of the city or no. Some discussion ensued, and a member rose, stating 
it little mattered, as it was notorious that Palladio was a Papist, and 
incapable as a matter of course. Lord Burlington's proposal was 
rejected, and the design of a freeman and Protestant adopted. The 
architect was originally a shipwright, and it has been likened to a deep- 
laden Indiaman. The portico is supported by six Corinthian columns. 
On the pediment is an allegory of the wealth of London. Here the 
Lord Mayor holds his court, as chief magistrate of the city. It was 
erected in 1753. 



B 3 



6 



OLD CHAIRS TO MEND!— RUSH OR CANE BOTTOMS- 
OLD CHAIRS TO MEND ! 

This artificer does not necessarily pay much rent for workshops, as 
he commences operations with his canes or rushes up the nearest court 
or gateway ; or, if the chairs are not wanted in a great hurry, asks per- 
mission to take them home, that he may work them in his back-room 
with more convenience, returning them to their owners when he next 
comes his rounds. 



THE OLD COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS, WARWICK LANE, 

was erected in 1674, from designs by Sir Christopher Wren, and con- 
sists of a quadrangular court. The room over the gateway, surmounted 
by a cupola and crowned with a ball, was the Lecture Theatre. In 
the court-yard, which has been roofed in, and is now used as a butchers' 
market, are statues of Charles II. and Sir J. Cutler. The building 
is now occupied by a coppersmith. Warwick Lane is chiefly tenanted 
by slaughtermen and carcase-butchers, being near to Newgate Market. 
Our view is taken from Paternoster Row, the literary mart of the world. 
The new College of Physicians is situated in Pall Mall East. 



0LD G0LLEGE 0F PHlTSKLftNS WARWICK LANE + 







OLD CHAIRS TO MEND 



I 



SMITKFIELD. 

ST: BARTHOLOMEWS HOSPITAUCHURCH. & CATHEDRAL OF SAINT PAUL- ■ 




CRT'S MEAT DOGS MEAT. 



CATS' MEAT !— DOGS' MEAT ! 

The food for these domestic animals is sold about London from bar- 
rows or small carts, and consists generally of the flesh of horses. As the 
vendor approaches, the cats or dogs bound out at the well-known cry, 
often forming such a group as we have here, in 

SMITHFIELD ; 

which is the only cattle market in London. It was formerly situated 
just without the city walls. It has been used as a cattle market since 
1 150, and was then, as we have stated, in the fields, but is now in the very 
heart of London. Our view was taken on Friday afternoon, during the 
horse market. Hay and straw are sold here on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 
and Saturdays. In the background may be seen the tower of the 
church of St. Bartholomew the Less, and the entrance to Bartholomew's 
Hospital: the present building was erected in 1730. Immediately 
above' the gateway of the hospital is seen the dome of 

ST. PAUL'S CATHEDRAL, 

for a nearer view of which we turn to the title-page. It was built by Sir 
Christopher Wren, on the site of the former, (burnt in the great fire,) 
and cost £736,000 : it took thirty-five years building, the expenses of 
which were raised by a duty on coals. 



s 



DUST OH !— DUST OH ! 

The costume of the Dustman bears a strong resemblance to that of 
the coalheaver, who appears to be of the same family, probably through 
their both being connected with the same material, the one before it is 
burnt, the other after. They formerly rang a bell to intimate their 
approach, but made so much noise therewith, as to cause the legislature 
to interfere, prohibiting its use. 

ST. JOHN'S GATE, CLERKENWELL. 

This building is the only relic of that once powerful military order of 
monks, St. John of Jerusalem. The priory was established about 1100, 
but it was forty years after this that they became a military order, and 
the noblest of the time sought admission into its ranks. In the thir- 
teenth century they were said to possess thirteen thousand manors, 
in various Christian lands. The house was suppressed by Henry VIII., 
who used it as a military storehouse. In the reign of James I. the gate 
was given to Sir Roger Wilbraham. Here, in 1730, Cave printed the 
" Gentleman's Magazine," which still bears a view of the gate on its 
cover ; it is now used as a public-house, and called the Old Jerusalem 
Tavern. It has lately been partially restored by voluntary subscrip- 
tions. 



ST' JQHNS GATE.CLSRKfiNWELL 




DUOT on* 



q 



1 



TEMPLE fijftP.'. 




BUY A LAC£ Or THE POOR BLIND. 



9 



PITY THE POOR BLIND ! 

The blind must gain a livelihood, as well as those who are blest with 
sight ; but, alas ! how few are the arts which can be performed by one 
so bereft : hence the necessity of an appeal to the benevolent — " Pity the 
poor blind !" He sells cabbage-nets, kettle-holders, or laces, doubtless 
the work of his own hands in the evenings, which we term " blindman's 
holiday." — We are proceeding along Fleet Street, soon to pass under 

TEMPLE BAR, 

which is the only remaining city gate* It was built in 1670, by Sir 
Christopher Wren, after the great fire. On this, the city side, are 
statues of James and Anne of Denmark ; on the other are Charles I. 
and II. The gate is now only closed on such occasions as the Queen 
going in state to the city, when she is not admitted until the pur- 
suivant has knocked and permission been granted by the Lord Mayor. 

On the top of this gate were formerly exhibited the heads of traitors : 
the last exposed here were those of persons who suffered after the 
rebellion of 1745. 

Horace Walpole, in a letter dated 16th Aug., 1746, says, "I have this 
morning been at the Tower, and passed under the new heads at Temple 
Bar, where people make a trade of letting spy-glasses, at a halfpenny 
each, to view them." One of the iron spikes remained till the present 
century. 



10 



UMBRELLAS TO MEND !— ANY OLD ONES TO SELL ! 

During the day the Umbrella-mender goes his rounds, repeating 
these words, " Umbrellas to mend ! Sixpence apiece for your old broken 
umbrellas !" and, having collected enough, he returns home to patch 
and mend, after which he or some of his family hawks them about for 
sale. Here he appears in his glory, under the auspices of St. Swithen, 
the patron saint of umbrella and patten-maker. It is the Strand, near 

SOMERSET HOUSE. 

On this site formerly stood Somerset Palace, built by Edward Sey- 
mour, Duke of Somerset, about 1549. The present building was begun 
in 1774, after a design by Sir W. Chambers. The Strand front is one 
hundred and thirty feet long, has a rustic basement supporting Corin- 
thian columns, and is crowned in the centre with an attic, surmounted 
by a group consisting of the arms of Britain supported by the genius of 
England and Fame. Nine large arches compose the basement, three of 
which open into the court. The key-stones are nine masks, representing 
the ocean and the eight chief rivers of England. In the quadrangle, 
directly fronting the entrance, is a bronze figure of the Thames, by 
Bacon ; also a statue of George III. It has a Thames front, with a 
spacious terrace and water-gate. 



SOMERSET HOUSE 




UMBRELLAS TO MEND, UNTOLD ONES TO >S£TLL/. 



// 



C0VENT GARDEN MftRKET 




CHERRY' RIPE J ROUND & SOUND ■<*? ft POUND* 



11 



CHERRIES, ROUND AND SOUND !— FULL WEIGHT, 
FOURPENCE A POUND ! 

Of cherries there are a great variety ; most come from the county of 
Kent, and are sold in the streets of London, sometimes as low as one 
penny per pound ! the sellers of which are often addicted to giving short 
weight, as their customers apprehend, hence the cry of " full weight." 



COVENT-GARDEN MARKET. 

The ground on which this market stands belonged to the Abbots 
of Westminster, and was called Convent Garden. On the destruction 
of the monasteries it was given to the Duke of Somerset ; and, after his 
misfortunes, was granted to the Earl of Bedford, in 1552, who let it for 
building, and Inigo Jones designed the piazza, a portion of which occu- 
pies the north and part of the east sides. The origin of the market was 
casual. Persons came here, and stood in the centre of the square, until it 
grew to the establishment of a market, which consisted of rough sheds 
until, about 1830, when the present market was built by the Duke of 
Bedford. One part is devoted to vegetables, and others to fruits, flowers, 
and plants. 



12 



THE COSTARD-MONGER 

(so called from an apple of that name) is an itinerant vendor of 
garden stuff. He mostly transports his vegetable wares in a cart drawn 
by a donkey. His cry varies with the seasons and their produce : at 
one time we have c l Cabbage plants," " New potatoes," or ts Asparagus ;" 
at another, " Fine young peas, fresh gathered," " Ripe rhubarb," "Baking 
or boiling apples :" he is now calling " Gooseberries ! fourpence an ale- 
house quart, gooseberries !" In the background is a seller of 

HEARTHSTONES AND FLANDERS BRICK. 

Punch's opera is proceeding along Bow Street with dog Toby in 
the rear, from whose petty stage we turn to one of the largest in the 
metropolis, 

COVENT-GARDEN THEATRE. 

The former theatre was burnt down, Sept. 20, 1808, and the present 
one erected on its site, at a cost of £150,000, by R. Smirke, R.A., who 
has taken as his model the temple of Minerva at Athens, and the first 
stone was laid in September, 1809, by George IV., then Prince of 
Wales. It was built with great rapidity, having been completed in less 
than a year after the destruction of the former building. Along the 
front are basso-relievos representing the ancient and modern drama ; and 
in niches at either end figures of Comedy and Tragedy, by Flaxman. 



G0VENT GARDEN THEATRE. 




TMJD COSTftRDMO NIGER 
HEARTH STO i\r ES. &rij A MDCRS B3RrCK\ 



r , - 



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WITH PART 



TRAFALGAR SQUARE. 

or the: national galleirv and saint martins church 




IMAGES, BUY IMAGES 



13 



IMAGES !— BUY IMAGES. 

The dealers in these articles are mostly Italians. The class of subjects 
sold in the streets were formerly of common-place interest, such as a 
parrot, horse, cat, or cow, but our vendor has some of a higher class — 
the Farnese Hercules, Baily's Eve at the Fountain, Cupid and Psyche, 
Chantrey's bust of Sir Walter Scott, &c. See, there is a Greenwich 
pensioner directing the attention of a young sailor to the Nelson co- 
lumn : he is perhaps describing the victory of the Nile or Trafalgar. 
There is a student of the Royal Academy observing their movements, 
very likely to introduce the scene in his next picture. 

TRAFALGAR SQUARE 

is an open space, bounded on the north by the National Gallery of 
Pictures and the Royal Academy of Arts, on the east by St. Martin's 
Church, south by Northumberland House and Charing Cross, and on the 
west by the new College of Physicians : in the centre is the Nelson 
column ; on either side are fountains. The National Gallery was built 
in 1837, by Sir W. Wilkins. St. Martin's Church was erected in 1722, 
by Gibbs: Nell Gwyn, who was buried here, left a weekly enter- 
tainment to the bell-ringers, which they still enjoy. The Admiralty 
being in the parish, it is usual to announce naval victories from the 
belfry of this church. 



14 

BAKED POTATOES, ALL HOT! 

How very cold it is ! the Potato-merchant jumps about to warm his 
feet. It is fine time for the boys ; they are pelting each other with 
snowballs. The drayman leads his team with care, lest they should slip 
on the icy road. See the snow on the statue of Charles ; it recalls to 
mind the burial of that unfortunate monarch, — the snow that fell then 
was looked upon as type of his innocence. 

CHARING CROSS. 

So named, from a cross erected there by Edward I., to commemorate 
his affection for his beloved queen, Eleanor. The cross marked the last 
resting-place of the body on its way to Westminster : the exact spot 
is now occupied by the equestrian statue of Charles I. ; it is in bronze, 
and was executed by Le Soeur, in 1638, for the Earl of Arundel. 

NORTHUMBERLAND HOUSE, 

the town residence of the Duke of Northumberland, forms one 
side of Trafalgar Square. It was built by Henry Howard, Earl of 
Northampton, in whose time it was called Northampton House. In 
1643 it fell to Algernon Earl of Northumberland, by marriage; since 
then it has been called Northumberland House. The only part seen 
from the street is the screen, which was repaired about 1752, but sup- 
posed to have been built in the reign of Edward VI. On the top is 
a, lion passant. A spacious court intervenes between this and the house, 
behind which are extensive gardens reaching down to the river. Ber- 
nard Jansen was architect of this ancient house, to which Inigo Jones 
erected a fourth side. 



CHARING CROSS 

WITH NQHTH UM BERLAN D HOUSE.AND STATUE OF KING CHARLES "!"H£FIR5T. 




BAKTED POTATOES ftttL ROT 



A 



I? 



WHITE HALL 




BOW PCVTSS 



15 



BOW POTS! (OR BAY POTS!) TWO A PENNY! 

They are mostly sold by women, who obtain them from Coven t- 
Garden Market or from nurserymen in the suburbs, and are offered to 
the lovers of nature in the more dense parts of our city. You perceive 
it is warm w T eather — a glorious summer's day ; the dust flies, and the 
watering-cart is about to render it more pleasant. We are in 



WHITEHALL, 

opposite the Banqueting House. It was begun in 1619, from designs 
by Inigo Jones, and is only part of a vast plan left unfinished by rea- 
son of the troubled times. Here was executed King Charles I. He 
passed to the scaffold through the north-end wall (to the left of the pic- 
ture). George I. converted it into a Chapel Royal, for which it is now 
used: the ceiling was painted by Rubens, in 1629 ; the subject is the 
Apotheosis of James I., for which he received £3000. In the square 
behind is a bronze statue of James II., by Gibbons. The Banqueting 
House cost about £17,000; and Inigo Jones, the architect, received but 
8s. 4rf, per day, with £46 per annum for house-rent. The master ma- 
son, Nicholas Stone, received 4s. lOd. per day. Such were the wages of 
architectural labour in those days ; though it is true that the value of 
money was greater then than it is now. 



16 



WILD DUCK, RABBIT, OR FOWL! 

Wild Ducks from the fens of Lincolnshire ; Rabbits from Hampshire, 
and Poultry from Norfolk. Our dealer has procured his stock at Leaden- 
hall Market, and is now crying them in Piccadilly. 



STRAWBERRIES, 

from Battersea and Fulham, where they are grown in large quantities, 
and sent to Covent-Garden Market, from whence the London dealer 
purchases them in large baskets (called rounds), containing many pot- 
tles. 

BURLINGTON HOUSE. 

We have given the entrance gateway, for no other part of this splen- 
did mansion can be seen from the street. This house was built by 
Richard Boyle, third Earl of Burlington, (who is said to have erected it 
there because he was certain no one would build beyond him,) from his 
own designs', assisted by Kent, who was his intimate friend and com- 
panion. It is very large, has a stone front, and a circular Doric colonnade 
joins the wings. Here were deposited those exquisite specimens of 
Grecian art, the Elgin Marbles, previous to their purchase by Govern- 
ment and removal to the British Museum. 






BURLINGTON H0USE .GATEWAY. 




WILD DUCK RABBIT OR TO WD 

S TjRAWBfiRRrES . 



.SAINT GEORGES HANOVER S0: 




NEW MACKEREL 



17 



MACKAREL!— NEW MACKAREL! 

Perhaps there are more of this fish sold than any other : they are 
very plentiful during spring. There is a law that permits of their being 
sold on Sundays, before divine service, on account of their perishable na- 
ture ; for it has been stated 10,000 mackarel, worth £200 in the morn- 
ing, would not be worth twenty shillings on the following day. Here 
comes the beadle, crossing George Street, to warn off a fish-woman, for 
it is eleven o'clock by 

ST. GEORGE'S, HANOVER SQUARE. 

This church was one of fifty, erected by act of Parliament in 1724. 
John James was the architect. The first stone was laid by General 
Stewart, with the following ceremony : — Having made a libation of wine, 
he pronounced these words: " The Lord God of heaven preserve the 
church of St. George!" It is dedicated to St. George the Martyr, in 
honour of George I. The subject of the altar-piece is the Last Supper, 
attributed to Sir James Thornhill. This church is remarkable for the 
number of fashionable marriages celebrated here. 



C 3 



18 



BUY A BOX!— BUY A BAND-BOX ! 

These useful articles are mostly the manufacture of the persons who 
carry them about for sale : they are of all shapes and sizes — cap-boxes, 
bonnet-boxes,. clothes-boxes, &c. 

OLD CLOTHES! 

" Clo! Clo!J" This is the abbreviated cry of the old clothesman, when 
going his rounds. The trade is mostly conducted by Jews, who take the 
morning purchases to Rosemary Lane, (commonly called Rag Fair,) near 
Tower Hill, where they dispose of them to dealers, who patch, mend, 
and sell again to the public. Our Jew, judging from his beard and band 
round his waist, is some dignitary of the synagogue ; he has just made a 
purchase of an old court suit at 

ST. JAMES'S PALACE. 

It is a plain brick building, and was erected by Henry VIII. in 1551. 
Queen Anne was the first to hold her court here, since which time it has 
been uniformly used for that purpose. Here is the Chapel Royal, in 
which our present Queen was married to Prince Albert : it is used only 
for purposes of state. King Charles I. passed the last eleven days of his 
life here, during his trial. A great portion of the south-eastern corner 
was destroyed by fire, in 1809. 



SAINT JAMES' PALACE 




OLD CLOTHES. 
BUY Pi. BOX, M BAND BOX 



I< 



■ :: 



WESTMINSTER ABBEY. 

AND TOWER Of SAINT MaRSARlTS CHURCH.^ 




MJhK BELOW. 






19 

MILK BELOW ! 
Of dealers in milk there are two classes, — the one keeping cows, the 
other purchasing from large dairymen in the outskirts, and retailing it 
on their own account. Their customers mostly live in neighbouring 
streets, which are called "milk-walks," and are often disposed of as other 
trades. It is stated that fifteen thousand cows are necessary to supply 
London with milk, and it has been calculated that it is usually adul- 
terated one-third. The milk-carriers of London are mostly Welsh girls, 
and did, until of late, wear the national hat. Our sketch exhibits 
one of them carrying home the produce of her master's cows from St. 
James's Park, while a man drives a cow and calf from the pasture there ; 
but this is a picture of the past. The park no longer affords pasture 
for cattle ; population has driven them farther away. The background 
remains the same. 

WESTMINSTER ABBEY. 

The present church was erected by Henry III. and his successors ; the 
western towers are by Sir Christopher Wren. Behind the altar is the 
chapel of Edward the Confessor, in which is kept the coronation chair : 
adjoining is the chapel of Henry V. Around these chapels are nine 
others, dedicated to various saints. Next to the eastern end of the 
church stands the chapel of Henry VII. The first stone was laid in Feb., 
1503, by Abbot Islop ; the building cost £14,000, an enormous sum for 
the period. It was designed by Sir Reginald Bray. The Abbey contains 
the monuments of many great men ; one spot is occupied by poets, and 
called " Poets' Corner." In the foreground may be seen the tower of 
the parish church of St. Margaret's, Westminster. 



20 



YOUNG WATER-CRESSES ! 

The morn has been proclaimed with " Sweep ! Soot oh ! " The in- 
mate of the downy bed has turned again to slumber — then follows 
c( Milk !" and now comes " Water-cresses !" 'Tis half-past eight; all are 
up, the door is mopped, and Betty runs to get the usual penny for the 
poor old dame in Milbank, Westminster. From here we obtain a good 
view of 

LAMBETH PALACE, 

which is the principal residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury. It is 
a very extensive and irregular pile, the principal part of which was built 
since the thirteenth century, the oldest part being the chapel. The 
great hall was erected by Archbishop Juxon, about 1600. The gate 
seen in the picture was built by Cardinal Morton in 1490, in front of 
which, to this day, is distributed the bishop's dole, or alms, to thirty poor 
parishioners of Lambeth, ten of whom are served each day; among 
them are distributed three stone of beef, ten pitchers of broth, five 
quartern loaves, and twopence in copper. At the back of this gate is 
the Lollards' Prison, a small room of great strength, in which prisoners 
have been confined for their religious opinions. Adjoining is the parish 
church of Lambeth. 



LAMBETH PALACE. 




WATER CRESSES 



1$> 



NEW HALL LINCQLNS INN 




KNIVES & SCISSORS TO ©RIPJD. 

BUY A MAT, MROPE OR PJ^RLrOUR MAT 



21 



KNIVES TO GRIND !— SCISSORS TO GRIND ! 

We here have a grinder executing a job under the entrance gateway 
to New Square, Lincoln's Inn ; who, if we may judge from the smile of 
satisfaction playing on his countenance, has had merry work amongst the 
cleavers of Clare Market, adjacent. Hoping he may find the like success 
with the pen-knives of the lawyers of Lincoln's Inn, we wish him " Good 
day ! " 

BUY A MAT!— BUY A DOOR OR PARLOUR MAT! 

They are manufactured of different materials : rope and rush mats for 
hall-doors. Parlour and carriage mats are made of sheep-skins, with the 
wool on, dyed of various hues. 

NEW HALL, LINCOLN'S INN, 

is situated on the eastern side of Lincoln's Inn Fields : it is of Tudor ar- 
chitecture, designed by Philip Hardwick, R.A., and consists of an ex- 
tensive dining-hall, spacious library, and benchers' drawingroom. It 
was opened Oct. 30, 1845, by the Queen, accompanied by his Royal 
Highness Prince Albert. Lincoln's Inn is one of the principal inns of 
court. 



22 



SWEEP !— SOOT OH ! 

This trade was, until of late, performed by small boys, who used to 
climb up chimneys, brushing away the soot as they went, until they 
arrived at the top, where they performed a rattle of triumph on the sides 
of the pot. Poor little sweep! your " occupation 's gone;" the term 
" climbing boy " will soon become obselete, for chimneys are now swept 
by machines, such as the one on the shoulders of the boy in our picture. 
He has been his morning's round, and perceives a chimney on fire, which 
he is off to extinguish, seeming to enjoy it much, no doubt on account 
of the extra fee on such occasions. The boys have got out the parish 
engine and the beadle. It is the 1st of May, the sweeps' grand day, 
when they perambulate the streets and collect donations, decked in rib- 
bons and finery, and dance round the ivy bower, called " Jack in the 
Green," to a drum and pandean pipes, which revelry seems to be for- 
gotten in the excitement of the moment : the smoke rolls over-head ; it 
must be in Guildford Place, opposite 

THE FOUNDLING HOSPITAL. 

Its name indicates its use. It is a plain brick edifice, with a chapel in 
the centre, founded, about the year 1722, by Captain Thomas Coram. 
It covers a large space, and is enclosed within a wall : here the children 
play. There are about 360, who are educated in a plain manner ; and 
when old enough the boys are apprenticed, and girls put to service. 



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NORTH WESTERN RAILWAY. 




MUrriMS, CRUMPETS 



23 



MUFFINS !— CRUMPETS !— ALL HOT MUFFINS ! 

This is an evening cry in winter, reminding us of a cheerful fire, cur- 
tains drawn, pleasant company, the hissing urn, and a goodly pile of 
these toasted luxuries hot and tempting. They are sold by boys or men, 
who carry a small bell, which they ring between the times of calling out 
their wares. Night is fast approaching, the lamp-lighter is at work, 
while the last rays of departing day gild the horizon, behind the portico 
of 

THE NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY. 

This is the most important line of communication up the country, and 
the most extensive in the kingdom: it was commenced in 1837, and 
originally called the "London and Birmingham Railway," from its 
ending in that town, 112 miles from London; but it is now the grand 
trunk line of numerous tributaries. Our view is of the Doric portico at 
the Euston station, Euston Square ; it is built of granite, from a 
design by Philip Hardwick, R.A., and is 70 feet in height. 



24 

BUY A BROOM! 

These tasteful articles are cut out of a single piece of wood, and 
carried about our metropolis by Bavarian women, who sing pleasing 
ditties in broken English; they are very tidy, and have a pictu- 
resque appearance. Here we have one offering a broom to the inmates 
of a carriage in the Regent's Park, near 

THE COLOSSEUM. 

It was erected some few years since for the exhibition of a panorama 
of London, painted by Mr. Horner, after sketches taken from a scaffold 
above the dome of St. Paul's Cathedral, (during the repairs of the ball 
and cross,) at sunrise, before the lighting of the innumerable fires. This 
glorious scene has been beautifully described by Wordsworth, in one 
of his sonnets : — 

"Earth has not any thing to show more fair: 

Dull would he be of soul who could pass by 

A sight so touching in its majesty : 

This city now doth like a garment wear 

The beauty of the morning ; silent, bare, 

Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie 

Open unto the fields and to the sky ; 

All bright and glittering in the smokeless air. 

Never did sun more beautifully steep 

In his first splendour valley, rock, or hill ; 

Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep ! 

The river glideth at his own sweet will : 

Dear God ! the very houses seem asleep ; 

And all that mighty heart is lying still !" 



COLISEUM 




BUY A BROOM 



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